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the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
martha washington's slave. out in 1796,ound that martha washington was planning to give her away. during the planning, slaves were away. this was upsetting, because the washington's had promised to free their slaves when they died. and she was going to be given away, that meant that she was going to be in slavery. she may plan to escape. she talks about this later, one whenng, in 1796, washington was sitting at the dinner table, literally, waiting for them to serve him, she escaped. she -- george decides that they are going to kidnap her. that was fairly common. >> how many stories are there like this? >> many. there were always african americans in the white house. james buchanan's administration. were upset.ners he dismissed the african- american staff and brought in irish and english house servants. that is the only time that happened. left the hercules, washington compound and was never found again. they think he was in new york. they do not know. not a lot of effort was made to find him. hise is trouble about slaves and hers. he freed his and he did not free hers. i do not know the
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," wri
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
opinion, and shaken policymakers in washington that it could very well end up being the gang changer. in terms of the short-term tactical strategy whethe whatevy end up doing, whether it nothing or cruise missiles strikes which could be a possibility since they have cruise missiles ships in the mediterranean or all-out war, there is no way to question. >> indeed. there is knowing and then seeing. thank you. >>> thousands are traveling to the nation's capitol commemorating mutter mutter's landmark "i have a dream speech." >> reporter: as the sun came up over washington the stage was being set on the steps of the lincoln memorial to honor a speech by a civil rights icon. many here today were only children when dr. king made his speech 50 years ago. >> during the march i was six years old, and i thought it would be very exciting to come and be a part of this. >> when i heard about t i was on board. we know the situation of the state of affairs, and we're just looking for a stage. it's time for a change. >> it's a continuation of the dream. the dream we still have. i think there are a lo
, his guilty" issumed premiering on msnbc will stop on the next washington journal, the rise of the conversation on drones and privacy issues. 745, -- and seven: 45, would talk about domestic drones -- at 7:45, we talk about the usage of domestic drones. , a privacy and west. washington journal begins live at 7:00 a.m. eastern time every day on c-span. wednesday, the center for american progress hosts a former -- a forum for preventing and ending human trafficking. obama's half-sister will be a speaker at the event. remember the march ending and dr. king delivering that speech will stop president kennedy invited us back to the white house and he stood in the door of the oval office to meet each one of us. he was like a beaming and proud father. he was glad that everything had gone so well. .e said, you did a good job he said to dr. king, you had a dream. >> tomorrow, we will look back with a panel conversation with john lewis and your chance to call in and comment. starting at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. ladieson two of first begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all united as never before on the goal of first class citizenship. >> to present to you the moral leader of the nation. i have the pleasure to present to you dr. martin luther king. [applause] i am happy to join with you today what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. [applause] five years ago, a great american in the shadow we stand today signed the emancipation proclamatio
and house members on syrian intelligence tomorrow in washington. officials were expected to lay out plans for military action against the assad regime. the head of the meeting, it is important that lawmakers ask tough questions of the president. for example, both iran and syria will attack israel if the u.s. launches a military attack. if it happens, how will the administration respond? will they help our closest ally in the region? finally, what is the end game if assad's regime is toppled? is there a possibility al qaeda-related elements may, in fact, take charge of the country? president george w. bush was hounded by the press over these questions. if he had to answer, so should barack obama. here in stud quo is fox news channel's own colonel oliver north. his new book out in paperback today. >> it is a must read for barack obama. he needs to read this one. it's about a president who forgets about 9/11. guess what's three weeks away? >> my concern is, first of all, this has been going on for 30 months. 100,000 killed. >> over 100,000 dead. over 250,000 wounded. 2.3 million people in re
was hearing on mr. summers preemptively, which is sort of a standard washington exercise, that i don't like him. because when someone has worked hard for me and on behalf of the american people and i know the quality of those people and i see them getting slapped around in the press for no reason even before they have been nominated for anything, then i want to make sure that somebody is standing up for them. i felt the same way when people were attacking susan rice before she was nominated for anything. so i tend to defend folks that i think i've done a good job and don't deserve attacks. my main criteria for the federal reserve chairman is somebody who understands they have to do a mandate, a critical part of the job is making sure that we keep inflation in check, that our monetary policy is sound, that the dollars sound. those are all critical components of the job and we see what happens when the fed is not paying attention. we saw prior to paul volcker coming into place inflation shooting up in ways that really damaged the real economy. but the other mandate is full employment. and rig
goodman in your first book "the exception to the rulers" you right and we we are quoting the "washington post" here that amy goodman is the journalist as uninvited guests. >> guest: we are not supposed to be a party to any party. we are journalists. there is a reason why our profession journalism is the only one explicitly protected by the u.s. constitution. we are supposed to be the check and balance on power. >> host: in-app look also war and peace, life and death. that is the role of the media in a democratic society to provide a forum for this discourse to do anything less is a disservice to the servicemen and service women of this country. >> guest: that's right. you know i had just flown in from denver where is that they national conference on media reform and when we flew into the airport at denver airport where people hold up signs when you come out to pick you up. as we were walking there were some soldiers there. they were going to be picking up the general and as we walked by they were waiting. i thought maybe the journalist behind me could see the sign for the general. we wen
th anniversary of the margin washington. -- the march on washington. he said something very important. today, we commemorate. tomorrow, we agitate. today, we commemorate. tomorrow, we agitate. today, we commemorate. tomorrow, and virginia, we agitate. tomorrow, we agitate. spanish] [speaking spanish] [applause] [speaking spanish] [speaking spanish] ok. [speaking spanish] [applause] [speaking spanish] si, se puede. si, se puede. [indiscernable] >> coming up on c-span, first .adies features ida mckinley talks aboutkerry chemical weapons in the spanish civil war -- in this year in its civil war. syrian civil war. health care and immigration. calls to impeach president obama. security issues and gridlock. a look at imminent domain loss. eagle.ss is steven washington journal is live every morning at 7:00 eastern. on c-span. secretary, security janet napolitano, delivers her address. she becomes the president of the university of california system. we have her remarks. >> c-span. we bring public affairs from washington to you. we put you in the room. complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the
, and i am the dr requestor, i live at 2974 washington street which is just to the south of 3871 jackson. and my wife and children and i have lived at this property for almost 20 years. we have seen a lot of remodels in our area. and we have never had to come before this commission. we have always figured out how to work with our neighbors. we were, we had a meeting after some confuse about the review process with mr. navy and the project manager and we requested that they come to our house and we hosted them at our house to review the plans. we had our neighbor with us as well who is here and has the comments as well. to review the comments as well. we raised a lot of concerns about the size of the remodel and as they were stated earlier, it would dramatically change the mid block open space and infringe on our privatecy in a large way, my daughter's bedroom is on the rear side of the house and so the large open windows would pier right into her bedroom and we are not comfortable with that at all. it did not seem appropriate to have a long discussion at that time, we had just met our ne
tv in prime time continues. watch that interview on c-span2. on the next washington journal look at the cost of college and whether or not an education is worth the money. after that, author and professor clarence on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and modern civil rights challenges. plus your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. ♪ it goes tout grant and universities every state in the nation. you hear about a breakthrough that happened in cancer research or diabetes research or autism or alzheimer's. it's very likely that frame a university or an institute somewhere in the u.s. and it was supported by the nih. that's what we do. we support the best and brighter to chase after the most visionary ideas. >> host: what did the directors influence on 27-different institute and center. how do you influence what goes on? >> guest: it's a very big place. 27 institute center they are various disease or organs in focus. there's a cancer institute, there's a diabetes institute, there's a heart, lung, and blood institute. there's an
in emily schmidt from washington. the state department decided to close those embassies and consulates just for sunday and now it will be extended through next weekend. what changed? >> they always said when they said it would be on sunday there was a possibility for extensions. we saw there would be indeed be extensions. it is doing so out of an abundance of caution. it is not an indication of a new threat stream. there is word from the state department about what will happen with the embassy closings. 19 will be closed through saturday august 10th. that is next saturday including new locations that were not closed today. but nine posts that were closed today will be allowed to reopen tomorrow. we are learning about what led to the shut downs. this is coming from barbara starr reporting an intercepted message that came in the past few days caused the concern. cnn agreed to a request not to go into details about the message because of the sensitivity but we know that this message was a critical factor in leading to the shutdown but not the only factor. u.s. officials have seen increased thr
washington d.c.. my colleague sack hunt who is also my son and i want to single them out because i can. thank you. i wrote this book for two reasons. two reasons mainly. one is i like a good story. i enjoyed writing, i have all my life. this just struck me as a pretty good yarn. this is a compelling story. it is also true. i hope it reads like this but it struck me at one point almost like a novel, almost stranger than fiction house some of these things happened and the interrelationships of people and leaders and so forth and first of all it struck me as a pretty cool story and i hope you will think so if you read the book. the other reason was after reflecting, after talking with these fellows and a number of other people in the room tonight, there were 163 interviews over a period of time, what struck me most of all was this was a very timely story for the age in which we now live which tends to be so contentious. we are sitting here with senator alexander who must live in this environment i am describing every day not only in washington but state capitals all over the country that we have
for a stop on the near side of washington and stockton. we generally support having four site stops. on this particular case we didn't feel it was safe because at the intersection and one bloke away there's 3 major construction projects that will be going on for several years. if the stop is on the far side it will create gridlock. we feel that further down the line open stockton that there was a variant to not eliminate parking but just to reduce the ladies and gentlemen of the jury, to two wired lanes we think that's a better solution. there's no need to pick a fight by removing parking. and finally we want again to caution that implementing transit signal priority technology can be both a good and bad thing. in chinatown over the last 36 years we found that we always try to reach a balance with the different uses. and if buses always get priority it would create gridlock again. thank you >> thank you. >> good afternoon i was given the privilege of speaking out of order so i'm not the person whose name appears after chin. i'm michael and i live on libl street. i'm an immigrant f
out in the book is that the deficit spending is routine in washington. it's 31 out of the last 35 years. the republicans and democrats are both involved. it is a, you know, there's not too much bipartisanship in washington but seems to be a bipartisan agreement to kind of kick this ball down the road. so, i think that, you know, we need to face up to the fact that the american people and its leaders have sort of joined in this kind of game where we pretend we can have very low taxes and have them even lower and still have lots of programs and services for the country, that the government pays for. and the numbers aren't adding up and there are going to be some tough political choices because we either have to raise taxes or cut back programs or do some of both and we need to do it for the budget and we need to look at it for social security and medicare, as well. >> host: scott bittle, page 83 of the book, you point out that the main function of the world's greatest superpower is, writing checks to retired people. yeah, we know it, you write, surprised us, too, you better sit down
in washington, d.c. to celebrate dr. king's legacy and civil rights progress over the past 50 years. what do you think they're thinking right there? most of these folks right here are under 50. they weren't here back then. what are they thinking? i bet they're curious. i bet that they wanted to capture -- i wonder what it was like being there? two former democratic presidents and president broem on hand to address the american people on this historic day. and how awesome they were. massive crowd there with joy in their heart as the nation's first black president spoke from the same spot dr. king did 50 years ago today. president obama paid tribute to the civil rights activist who's marched for change in the face of adversity. >> because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched the civil rights law was passed. because they marched a voting rights law was signed. because they marched doors of opportunity and education swung open so their daughters and sons could finally imagine a life for themselves beyond washing somebody else's laundry or shining somebody else's shoes. because t
the association that wi about at en talking the washington convention center. the association of unmanned international. another "washington journal" comes your way at 7:00 a.m. tomorrow. then.l see you [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> taking a look at some of our live programming -- in about half an hour, the senior -- inder in a guest a map a chemist and will brief reporters. -- in afghanistan will brief reporters. att is scheduled to start 10:30 a.m. eastern. later today, president obama's half-sister will address the traffickingf ending exploitation of women and children and speaking at the center for american progress live at noon eastern. be sure to join us this evening for another of our town hall meetings. the focus today is unimplemented asian of the affordable care act. administration will delay implementation of the section of the law covering limits to out- of-pocket costs for consumers. we will check in on congressional town hall meetings around the nation and what questions members of congress
agree on except this. washington stinks. president obama's approval rating plum sed. 82% think the lawmakers deser s deserve to take off the month of august. congress is never popular. washington doesn't rate well on the popularity scale. people tend to personally like their own congressman. the reports we are getting back is that this time it could be different. i wanted to ask you, do you think some of the incumbent are in trouble? >> i talked to democratic campaign committee who handles the house. the average rating of approval for members of the house is about 88% or 89%. 70% now. i think the idea of a safe incumbent -- when i was in the business if you had an incumbent very rare they lose. if a wave if a big issue comes along a lot of people who think they are safe will be in trouble. >> anything we are learning in august 2013 tell us something about what will happen in mid term of november 2014. because president obama's numbers are not good now it's hard to get those back up. and then if you take the fact that most incumbents lose seats from their party in congress at t
washington, d.c. for five weeks in august. before i was even sworn in, i wrote a letter to the majority leader, eric cantor saying my evaluation of your calendar says we will not be able to get our work accomplished. sure as all get out we didn't. here we are again, they did not get all the appropriations bills passed, so they have to do another stopgap continuing resolution measure. this is the type of stuff that really doesn't the american people. >> 1791 when it was so hot here in town members of congress were dropping over dead. they did it because of the heat here in washington. >> we've got air conditioning now. >> 1950, i actually researched that. 1950 we got air conditioning in the capital. so for almost 60 years. >> greta, let me tell you something. it's like 133 degrees in southern afghanistan and guys have on all of their gear, helmets and what have you. they don't get to take a five-week vacation. >> point well taken. do you think the president likes this job? >> i don't know. i think that he is enjoying this job. as far as is he able to properly execute the duties he's been
, as it turns out, nixon was also rooting for the other side, the washington redskins who lost to the dolphins in super bowl vii. the rest of the beltway crowd either supported the redskins skins or waffled on the issue. just take a look at this coverage from the day before that big game in january of 1973, there wasn't a single dolphins fan. >> among those 75 million spectators will be one president of the united states and many members of congress and other washington figures. we asked them to talk about the super bowl and here's what they said. >> who's going to win the big game, senator. >> it's a tossup. >> well, the retd skins. >> what's your prediction, senator. >> on what? >> going to be a great game, great game. >> i don't like to jinx the redskins but i thinked redskins are going to win. >> i'm for the over the hill game. >> the redskins are going to win the big game. >> the better team will win. >> which is going to be the better team? >> the one who gets the most points. >> the redskins, of course. >> the redskins. >> why? >> because they have more crash worthy request. >> >> the r
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